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Year : 2017  |  Volume : 49  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 10--15

A study of antimicrobial use in children admitted to pediatric medicine ward of a tertiary care hospital

Sandip Baidya1, Avijit Hazra1, Supratim Datta2, Amal Kanti Das1 
1 Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Avijit Hazra
Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal
India

Objectives: Antimicrobials are frequently used in tertiary care hospitals. We conducted an observational study on children admitted to a teaching hospital in Eastern India, to generate a profile of antimicrobial use and suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) attributable to them. Materials and Methods: Hospitalized children of either sex, aged between 1 month and 12 years, were studied. Baseline demographic and clinical features, duration of hospital stay, antimicrobials received in hospital along with dosing and indications and details of suspected ADRs attributable to their use were recorded. Every patient was followed up till discharge, admission to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, or death. Results: Over the 1 year study period, 332 admissions were screened. The prevalence of antimicrobial use was 79.82%. The majority of the 265 children who received antimicrobials were males (61.10%) and hailed from rural and low socioeconomic background. Median age was 36 months. Six children died, 43 were transferred out, and the rest discharged. In most instances, either 2 (40%) or a single antibiotic (39.6%) was used. Ceftriaxone, co-amoxiclav, amikacin, vancomycin, and ampicillin were predominantly used. Antivirals, antimalarials, and antiprotozoals were used occasionally. Average number of antimicrobials per patient was 2.0 ± 1.27; the majority (84.1%) were by parenteral route and initial choice was usually empirical. Prescriptions were usually in generic name. The antimicrobial treatment ranged between 1 and 34 days, with a median of 7 days. Six ADRs were noted of which half were skin rash and the rest loose stools. Conclusions: The profile of antimicrobial use is broadly similar to earlier Indian studies. Apparent overuse of multiple antimicrobials per prescription and the parenteral route requires exploration. Antimicrobials are being used empirically in the absence of policy. ADRs to antimicrobials are occasional and usually mild. The baseline data can serve in situation analysis for antibiotic prescribing guidelines.


How to cite this article:
Baidya S, Hazra A, Datta S, Das AK. A study of antimicrobial use in children admitted to pediatric medicine ward of a tertiary care hospital.Indian J Pharmacol 2017;49:10-15


How to cite this URL:
Baidya S, Hazra A, Datta S, Das AK. A study of antimicrobial use in children admitted to pediatric medicine ward of a tertiary care hospital. Indian J Pharmacol [serial online] 2017 [cited 2022 Nov 29 ];49:10-15
Available from: https://www.ijp-online.com/article.asp?issn=0253-7613;year=2017;volume=49;issue=1;spage=10;epage=15;aulast=Baidya;type=0