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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 37--41

Competence of medical students in communicating drug therapy: Value of role-play demonstrations

Yasin I Tayem1, Abdulaziz S Altabtabaei2, Mohamed W Mohamed2, Mansour M Arrfedi2, Hasan S Aljawder2, Fahad A Aldebous2, Henry James1, Khalid A. J. Al Khaja1, Reginald P Sequeira1 
1 Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain
2 Medical Students, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain

Correspondence Address:
Yasin I Tayem
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Arabian Gulf University, Manama
Bahrain

Objectives: This study used role-play demonstrations to train medical students to communicate drug therapy and evaluated the perceptions on this instructional approach. Materials and Methods: The second-year medical students who attended a prescription writing session (n = 133), participated in this study. Prescription communication was introduced by using role-play demonstrations. Participant«SQ»s perceptions were explored by a self-administered questionnaire and focus group discussion. The academic achievement of attendees and nonattendees was compared with an objective structured performance evaluation (OSPE) station that tested students«SQ» competence in this skill. Results: Most attendees responded to the questionnaire (81.2%). Almost all respondents expressed their desire to have similar demonstrations in other units. A large proportion of participants reported that role-play demonstrations helped them develop their communication skills, in general, confidence to communicate drug-related information in a prescription, and the ability to explain the aim of drug therapy to patients. Most trainees thought also that they developed skills to communicate instructions on drug use including drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, adverse drug reactions, and warnings. During the focus group interviews, students thought that role-play was useful but would be more beneficial if conducted frequently in small group as part of the curriculum implementation. The majority of students also reported improved competence in writing a complete prescription. Analysis of attendees and nonattendees grades in the OSPE showed that the former scored higher than the latter group (P = 0.016). Conclusions: Role-play demonstrations were well accepted by medical students and led to the development of their competence in communicating drug therapy to patients.


How to cite this article:
Tayem YI, Altabtabaei AS, Mohamed MW, Arrfedi MM, Aljawder HS, Aldebous FA, James H, Al Khaja KA, Sequeira RP. Competence of medical students in communicating drug therapy: Value of role-play demonstrations.Indian J Pharmacol 2016;48:37-41


How to cite this URL:
Tayem YI, Altabtabaei AS, Mohamed MW, Arrfedi MM, Aljawder HS, Aldebous FA, James H, Al Khaja KA, Sequeira RP. Competence of medical students in communicating drug therapy: Value of role-play demonstrations. Indian J Pharmacol [serial online] 2016 [cited 2022 Sep 27 ];48:37-41
Available from: https://www.ijp-online.com/article.asp?issn=0253-7613;year=2016;volume=48;issue=1;spage=37;epage=41;aulast=Tayem;type=0