IPSIndian Journal of Pharmacology
Home  IPS  Feedback Subscribe Top cited articles Login 
Users Online : 671 
Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
Navigate Here
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1038    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded42    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 CLINICAL RESEARCH ARTICLES
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 52  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 378-382

Presence of allele CYP3A4*16 does not have any bearing on carbamazepine-induced adverse drug reactions in North Indian people with epilepsy


1 Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Experimental Medicine and Biotechnology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Immunopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
4 Department of Pharmacology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Julie Sachdeva
Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijp.IJP_549_20

Rights and Permissions

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in gene encodings for CYP3A4 and carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced dose-related side effects in North Indian people with epilepsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The current prospective study included 37 patients with CBZ-induced dose-related side effects and 102 patients who did not experience side effects while on CBZ. The genotyping for CYP3A4 allele (CYP3A4*16) was done using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in Applied Biosystems 7500 RT-PCR System (USA). CBZ was administered in all patients at a dose varying from 15 to 20 mg/kg daily. RESULTS: Various demographic variables were comparable between the groups except that control of seizures was far better in controls. After testing, it was found that none of our patients had the presence of CYP3A4*16 allele. CONCLUSION: CYP3A4*16 allele is not represented significantly in North Indian people with CBZ-induced dose-related side effects.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Site Map | Home | Contact Us | Feedback | Copyright and Disclaimer
Online since 20th July '04
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow