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 RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 15-20

The effect of learning styles and study behavior on success of preclinical students in pharmacology


1 Department of Pharmacology, Suleyman Demirel University Faculty of Medicine, Isparta, Turkey
2 Department of Medical Education, Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Department of Medical Education and Informatics, Suleyman Demirel University Faculty of Medicine, Isparta, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Halil Asci
Department of Pharmacology, Suleyman Demirel University Faculty of Medicine, Isparta
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0253-7613.174418

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Objectives: To evaluate the effect of learning styles and study behaviors on preclinical medical students' pharmacology exam scores in a non-Western setting. Materials and Methods: Grasha-Reichmann Student Learning Study Scale and a modified Study Behavior Inventory were used to assess learning styles and study behaviors of preclinical medical students (n = 87). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effect of gender, age, learning style, and study behavior on pharmacology success. Results: Collaborative (40%) and competitive (27%) dominant learning styles were frequent in the cohort. The most common study behavior subcategories were study reading (40%) and general study habits (38%). Adequate listening and note-taking skills were associated with pharmacology success, whereas students with adequate writing skills had lower exam scores. These effects were independent of gender. Conclusions: Preclinical medical students' study behaviors are independent predictive factors for short-term pharmacology success.






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